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Where Can Defendants be Served?

If someone has filed a civil lawsuit against you, you may be wondering exactly where the process server might show up. Defendants often have misconceptions about where they can and cannot be served, like believing that they can’t be served at work or in public. Unfortunately for them, these beliefs just aren’t true.

No Safe Zones

The truth is that a process server can serve a defendant with process documents pretty much anywhere as long as they do not break any laws in doing so. This means a defendant can be served at their own home, at their place of employment, or anywhere in public.  Continue reading

Ways to Spot a Scam Process Server

Your civil complaint is filed and the Denver County Clerk of Court has issued you a summons, so now it’s time to serve the defendants and witnesses in your case. You have a couple of options in Colorado when it comes to the serving process – law enforcement or a private individual. If you opt for law enforcement, then you’ll want to contact the sheriff’s department in the county where the process is to be served. If you’d rather just use a private individual, Colorado’s laws are actually pretty lenient on who that can be. As long as the person is 18 years old or older and is not a party to the case, they can serve the process for the case. However, there are always advantages to using a professional process service agency versus just asking a friend.

One of those advantages is that you won’t have to worry about being scammed for your cash and left with unserved paperwork, case delays, and possibly even case dismissal. Just like so many industries, scammers have proliferated in the process service field in states like Colorado, where the laws are so lax on who can serve process. Fraudsters take advantage of this lack of regulation and con unsuspecting plaintiffs (and sometimes even attorneys) out of their hard-earned cash by committing to serving the process, only to run off once payment is made without actually delivering anything. 

So how do these process service scams in Colorado work? Continue reading

Top Questions to Ask Before Hiring a Process Server

Do you need to hire a process server in Colorado? Colorado doesn’t have any certification or licensure requirements for process servers. As long as the server is 18 or older and not directly involved in the case, they’re good to go. But just because the state is lax on who can serve process doesn’t mean you should let just anyone handle your process! Delivering court documents is an important part of any legal case, and you want to be sure that yours are delivered to the right person and on time. That’s why you should always opt for the services of a professional process service company for this vital task.

When searching for a process server, be sure to ask the following questions so you are informed and sure that you’re going with the best possible candidate: Continue reading

How to Track Down a Missing Person that Needs to be Served

If you’re trying to serve process to someone in Colorado that doesn’t want to be found, you’re in luck! The professional process servers at Accurate Serve® in Denver are trained to hunt down even the most evasive individuals. We can even do skip traces or diligent searches to find process recipients. But how do we do it? 

Our clients typically provide some very basic information about the defendants and witnesses they need to serve. If the client happens to know the defendant or witnesses well, then they usually give enough information for us to find the intended recipient with ease. However, there are times when things aren’t so easy. In this post, we’ll go over some of our top tips for locating defendants and witnesses for service of process. Continue reading

Why You Need a Process Server

Here in Colorado, you may be wondering if you really need to hire a process server to deliver your court paperwork. While saving some cash by trusting your process to a friend or family member may sound tempting, it can really mess up your case in the end if the process is not served in a valid manner. In this post, we’ll go over the reasons why hiring a private process server is always a good idea.

Your Time is Valuable

Many people underestimate the value of their time. If you’re an attorney who works several cases at the same time, you’ve already got a lot on your plate. The last thing you need to be doing in chasing case defendants around town. Manage your time wisely by trusting your case process to a professional process server, like those here at Accurate Serve® of Denver. Continue reading

The Consequences of Avoiding a Process Server

If someone is taking you to court because they believe you owe them money, you probably would like to avoid the entire situation. Unfortunately, that is not possible. No matter how many times you duck and dodge a process server attempting to deliver the court summons and complaint to you, you will still end up being served. How? When a defendant avoids service to stall a court case, the plaintiff can request service by substitution or publication. If allowed, this means that someone other than the defendant can be served the court documents or that a notification about the pending service may be published in the local newspaper. Once the terms of the alternative service have been met, the defendant will be required to appear in court on the scheduled date or face the consequences. Some of the most common potential consequences for avoiding a process server include: Continue reading

Things a Process Server Can Use to Get the Door Answered

Is a process server searching for you because of a court case or lawsuit? Wondering what exactly the server can do to find and serve you? In this post, we’ll cover what a process server is, some of the most common tactics process servers can use to find their target, and what is not allowed.

What Does a Process Server Do?

A process server is a person who delivers legal papers to another individual, usually through personal delivery or by mail. The process server must attempt to give the document to the recipient in person if possible. If the recipient is unavailable after multiple attempts, the server may ask for permission to serve the recipient by alternative means. Continue reading

How Many Days are Given to a Process Server to Serve Case Documents in Denver?

When serving process in the state of Colorado, process servers have a specific number of days to complete their service. This article will explore what that timeframe is, as well as some possible consequences for not completing service within that time limit.

What is Service of Process?

Service of process is the process of providing a defendant with notice of a pending legal action against them. This allows the defendant an opportunity to defend themselves in court. In order for the service of process to be valid, the summons and complaint must be delivered to the defendant in a way that meets the requirements of due process. Continue reading

What is a Process Server?

Definition of a Process Server

A process server hand delivers (most of the time) court case paperwork to the parties named in the case. While this job may sound a little underwhelming, it actually plays a very important role in the American legal system and upholds the constitutional rights of court litigants every single day.

Due Process

Did you know that part of the 14th Amendment of the U.S. Constitution refers to the need for process servers? It’s known as the “Due Process Clause”, and it prohibits the government from depriving “any person of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law.” That due process of law includes notification of upcoming court dates so that the defendant or witness has adequate time to prepare. That notification, in many cases, comes from process servers. Continue reading

Important Rules Process Servers Must Follow

In Colorado, there is no certification or licensing program for private process servers. Instead, the courts rely on honesty amongst servers, attorneys, and litigants to ensure that the case process is served and received as intended.

Even though there is not an official process server designation in the state, there are still rules that anyone serving process in Colorado must follow. At a minimum, process servers are expected to: Continue reading

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